REDISCOVERING ROSCOE: THE FILMS OF "FATTY" ARBUCKLE (HARDCOVER EDITION) by Steve Massa

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978-1-62933-453-0

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Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle was a silent comedy trailblazer--the teacher of Buster Keaton, a collaborator of Charlie Chaplin—whose reputation was eclipsed for many years by his involvement in one of Hollywood's first scandals. Rediscovering Roscoe is a film by film examination of his work as a performer, director, and all around comedy creator.
Having learned and developed his craft on the stage, Arbuckle came to films in 1909. After joining Mack Sennett's Keystone Company he became one of the most important pioneers of American silent comedy, as well as a screen icon known around the world.


This filmography details his initial forays into films and mastering of the medium, but also his banishment from the screen and ultimate comeback. It is lavishly illustrated with more than 500 rare photographs and advertising images.

Steve Massa is the author of Slaptstick Divas: The Women of Silent Comedy, Lame Brains and Lunatics: The Good, The Bad, and the Forgotten of Silent Comedy, and Marcel Perez: The International Mirth-Maker.


" Steve Massa has become a world-class chronicler and archeologist of silent comedy, and his latest endeavor is a massive undertaking, as befits its subject. Rediscovering Roscoe is a hefty 692 pages long and incorporates 500 rare photos. It also marks the first time anyone has focused exclusively on Arbuckle’s career and its many highlights. He was an established star at Mack Sennett’s Keystone Studio before Charlie Chaplin, who became a collaborator when he arrived in 1914. He started directing his own short subjects that same year and graduated to feature-length films before Chaplin. He famously ushered Buster Keaton into the world of filmmaking. He was a talented man who was known and loved the world over. Yet the scandal that ended his career has eclipsed everything else he accomplished. That’s why this book is both overdue and welcome."
- Leonard Maltin

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